cinematic

“We see too many movies…They kill the imagination.  You’ve heard of blind storytellers.  It’s in darkness that myths are born.  The cinema can’t do that.  Did I tell you about the girl I took to lunch?…in a sense it’s that way with her.  She can never dance.  That’s why the real grace, the real music is in her.”  (my ellipses)

-James Salter, Light Years

Advertisements

vom geist der schwere

And when I saw my devil, I found him serious, thorough, profound, solemn: 
he was the spirit of gravity–through him all things fall.
 

-Friedrich Niezche, Also sprach Zarathustra

correspondence

c.1990: 

To date no Vietnam movie has been shot on the original battlegrounds, but I’m confident it will happen, and might even get out of control.
 
-J.G.Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition (revised, expanded, annotated, 1990)

2002:  http://www.northernartsentertainment.com/film_detail.html?ID=3&poster=1

2004:

numinous

a ‘response’ to ‘Pursewarden’:

…when we watch a film, we are really looking at a sequence of still images, presented to us at such a rate that we see movement.  This is sometimes described by saying that the sequence of still images creates the illusion of motion, but that is not quite right.  It is the still images themselves that are the illusion.  The world is never stil—it is always in motion.  The illusion that photography creates is of a frozen moment of time.  It corresponds to nothing in reality, nor is it itself real, for any photograph is also a process…So what happens in a movie is that the real world of motion and change is recreated from a sequence of illusions, not the reverse.

-Lee Smolin, Three Roads to Quantum Gravity

fact/fiction

We all dream, yet most of us have no problem distinguishing our dreams from our experiences when awake.  We all tell stories, but most of us believe there is a difference between fact and fiction.  As a consequence, we talk about dreams, fiction and our ordinary experience in different ways which are based on different assumptions about the relation of each to reality.  These assumptions can differ slightly from person to person and from culture to culture, and they are also subject to revision by artists of all kinds.  If they are not spelled out the result can be confusion and disorientation, either accidental or intended.

-Lee Smolin, Three Roads to Quantum Gravity

mercurial/mercuric

‘Are people’ writes Pursewarden ‘continuously themselves, or simply over and over again so fast that they give the illusion of continuous features–the temporal flicker of old silent film?’

-Lawrence Durrell, Justine

force/mastery

“An artist doesn’t tell people things, he expresses himself.  If the self is unusual his work shocks or excites people…it forces his personality on them.” (my ellipses)

-Alasdair Gray, Lanark

nomic

A name can be a curse.  Some are dragged along by their name, like muddy river waters after a heavy shower, however much they may resist they’re propelled towards their destination…Others, on the contrary — their names are like masks that hide them, that deceive.  Most have no power at all, of course.

– Jose Eduardo Agualusa, The Book of Chameleons (originally published in Portuguese as O vendedor de passados)

geometric

…by the word “true” we are eventually in the habit of designating always the correspondence with a “real” object…[my ellipses]

-Albert Einstein, Relativity

« Previous PageNext Page »